...

...

Search This Website

Loading...

Monday, January 28, 2008

Hindu household, Urdu nameplate


Over the last couple of decades I have seen Urdu signboards and nameplates disappear fast across the country.
As Urdu is not supposed to be a language that will attract the consumers, shop-owners are also not keen on having display boards in Urdu.
In Muslim localities also Urdu nameplates are now hard to find except in a few cities. That's why such nameplates fascinate me.
Still, in some Kayastha houses you can spot old Urdu nameplates. On the left is the photo of one non-Muslim house sporting an Urdu nameplate.
The owner's name is Awadh Narayan. He is not a Kayastha though. And that's Circa 2008.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Is urdu a language or a script?

Tickle said...

It is a language that has a script of its own,which is closer to Persian and Arabic. Just like English has a script (Roman).

Anonymous said...

So the name plate is just in persian script. right?

Anonymous said...

Urdu is the language of India but fell victim to communalism and mit was associated with Muslims. Hindus don't use it.

Urdudaan said...

Adnan bhai...Very true!

I have seen muslims going to the extent of saying that 'Urdu' signboard or the mention of 'Halaal' on their menu might turn non-muslim customers away. I firmly believe that I am yet to find a non-muslim doing so. It is the quality alone that matters to one and all, communals and seculars alike. I purchase milk from a shop where mantras are played all the time and I will continue to do so till the time he either misbehaves or the quality deteriorates.

On the other hand, non-muslims have weired notions about Urdu and are not at all enthusiastic about it in the 'real sense'.